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South West Sydney Research facilitates world-class research by supporting multi‑professional and multi‑centre collaboration, working to improve our competitiveness, and reducing barriers to research conduct and translation.

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Do you have a high quality biospecimen collection and associated data that could be used to investigate priority health issues for NSW? Applications are now open for our Biospecimen Collection Grants (round two) https://www.medicalresearch.nsw.gov.au/biospecimen-collections/

LATEST RESEARCH 📑: Our colleague Tim Churches and Louisa Jorm from the Centre for Big Data Research in Health publish in JMIR Public Health Surveillance on COVOID - a stochastic individual contact model used to evaluation COVID-19 interventions DOI: 10.2196/18965

Plenty of events listed on our events page for July including webinars from @AusHealthcare, @FranklinWomen @MBG_SPHERE @ConcertTcrc @AHPA_AU and more. https://www.southwestsydneyresearch.org.au/events/

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Re-inventing the Whirligig

Nature

Low-tech innovation for health care delivery in low-resource settings

Innovative researchers from Stanford University, California have developed a unique centrifuge for use in health-care clinics where electricity and resources are in scarce supply. The whirligig, a low-tech childhood toy often made from a button and a length of string, has been re-imagined as a hand-powered centrifuge to separate blood samples and support the efficient diagnosis of disease.

Devin Powel of Nature: News spoke with one of the innovators behind the new device, Manu Prakash, and explored how Manu came to identify the need for low-tech centrifuge solutions. “While visiting health-care clinics, he noticed that most lacked a working centrifuge — or the electricity to power one — and could not separate blood samples to perform basic disease diagnostics.”

Manu and his team explored a number of low-tech options before settling on the whirligig as the most efficient, and effective, pseudo-centrifuge.

Read Devin’s full article here.

Read the original journal article here.

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Do you know about innovative solutions being developed in South West Sydney? We’d love to hear about them!

Please let us know by sending an email to info@southwestsydneyresearch.org.au.