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Admit one: see the future of cancer therapy

Right here in Liverpool, we’re building what will become the most advanced radiotherapy treatment tool in the world − and for the first time, we’re inviting the people of western Sydney to come and see it.

Anyone familiar with the work we do at the Ingham Institute would have heard us talk about the MRI-Linac. We’re in the business of fighting disease, and the MRI-Linac will, once it’s completed, be one of the world’s most advanced tools for attacking cancer.

In 2015, more than 131,000 cancer patients presented for treatment in south-western Sydney. More than half of this number (51 per cent) needed treatment for tumours, including radiation and surgery.

We’re designing and building the MRI-Linac so that we can offer these patients image guided radiation therapy − or in other words, radiation that can much more accurately track and target tumours using MRI as the patient is being treated, something that cannot be done today. As a result, we will also be able to offer more powerful radiation treatment while at the same time, avoid the risk of damaging healthy tissue.

State of the art: Ingham Institute’s MRI-Linac project team pictured with the MRI-Linac’s magnet.

Liverpool is one of only four research institutions in the world, and the only one is Australia, that is building an MRI-Linac machine, and we believe our design is unique compared to other models under development.

Working with South West Sydney’s Cancer Therapy Centres and specialists from Sydney, Wollongong, Queensland, Stanford, Western Sydney and NSW Universities, our researchers are essentially inventing new technological solutions.

We’ve reached a point where we can not only demonstrate the technology works, but explore how it will one day revolutionise the way we treat cancerous tumours here and around the world.

We are inviting our neighbours in western Sydney to experience history in the making and book a tour of the MRI Linac while it is still under construction. Guided tours are free and can be arranged by calling the Ingham Institute on 1800 665 541.

You can step inside the bunker housing our MRI Linac prototype and see close-up what the future of cancer therapy looks like. To register for the MRI Linac tour, call 1800 665 541. Visit www.inghaminstitute.org.au for more on Ingham Institute’s medical research.

​Gary Liney, Senior MRI Researc Physicist, Ingham Institute

This article was published in the Liverpool City Champion on 13 Dec 2016, 11:09 a.m. Read the original article here.

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Associate Professor Gary Liney is a south west Sydney researcher with the Ingham Institute and University of New South Wales. To find and connect with South West Sydney Researchers, try our ‘Find-a-researcher’ search.

Read more about the MRI-Linac in our earlier post.

Interested in a career in medical radiation physics? In the article Duo’s passion for science leads to careers in medical radiation physics, graduates from the University of Wollongong encourage other females to explore STEM subjects.